Month: June 2021

 

Tom Palmer – Stade Francais and England

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Learn more about Tom’s teammates from Stade Francais…James Haskell Tom Palmer preparing for a lineout against South AfricaThe England second-row has finally found his stride in Test rugby this year.England’s stunning performance against Australia at Twickenham during the Autumn internationals left many of their long-suffering fans – and the media – shocked by how well the team had played. Manager Martin Johnson wasn’t surprised, however, telling me: “That performance didn’t come from the clouds, you know. Look at Paris, look at Sydney – it was coming.” Johnson as usual, may have a point, but even he must have been taken aback by the form of Tom Palmer in that victory over the Wallabies.Second-row Palmer has been one of the enigmas of the England set-up ever since making his Test debut in 2001; he had bags of potential but he just wasn’t delivering the world-class performances we all knew that he was capable of.However, Palmer’s graduation onto the world stage started in the summer, when he first formed his partnership with Courtney Lawes in England’s one-point win in Sydney, and his best performance in the red-rose jersey came against the same side five months later.The identity of the opponents can give some clue to Palmer’s recent form, as could the new law directives that referees have been working under since the middle of the Six Nations. Quick ball is now king in a sport that had been dragged through a season of kick-tennis that sent us all to sleep. And a fast game suits Palmer perfectly; with the ball now in play more than ever before, he’s able to get his hands on it and maraud through the midfield.Alongside Lawes, who looks good enough to keep his place in the side for the next ten years, Palmer also calls the lineouts. And while his running of the set-piece doesn’t reach the A+ levels of Steve Borthwick, he got better and better as the autumn Tests wore on. He has clearly benefited enormously from the extra time the players now have with England, especially as it has brought him into contact with renowned knee specialist Bill Knowles, who put the careers of Richard Hill, Austin Healey and footballer Michael Owen – amongst others – back on track. Although Palmer doesn’t have a current knee injury, Knowles’s grasp of the human body has proved crucial. “I’ve had some knee issues in the past and he had me doing some exercises to get my glutes working better and that seems to have helped me feel fitter than I have for a while,” says Palmer.Palmer, who has bulked up by around nine pounds in the past year, has endured a stop-start international career – there was a five-year gap between his first and second caps – but he has made a significant breakthrough in the last six months, starting England’s last half-dozen Tests. And he is delighted to have Lawes in the boiler room with him, saying: “Courtney and I haven’t played 50 times together, but we’re starting to establish ourselves as a partnership. Hopefully that will continue through the Six Nations. We complement each other well and are a good match. We’re similar players and the way the game is going is suited to how we play.“It’s partly down to a change in attitude of the coaches, in terms of which players they want, and the new laws. In order to encourage open and attacking play, you need guys who are mobile and can carry the ball. I like it when I get my hands on the ball. Our game plan at the moment suits players like me.”center_img Palmer is a cosmopolitan fellow – no one could accuse him of letting the grass grow under his feet. Born in Haringey, North London, he grew up in Scotland and then spent 18 months receiving a world-class rugby education in Otago as a teenager. His professional career began at Leeds, then he joined Wasps before moving to Paris at the start of last season, ensuring that he had all the correct release clauses in his Stade Français contract so he could make England training sessions.“I’m enjoying my time in Paris, and it’s been good for my career – a good experience for me,” says Palmer. “I’m just happy that I’m playing well and getting picked for England.” England were rightly delighted by their performance against Australia last month, but a hard-fought victory over Samoa as well as a 21-11 defeat in their final Test against South Africa meant that there was a feeling of disappointment at the end of the autumn series. But Palmer believes the team will have learnt a lot from all the matches.“If you look at the whole series we played some good rugby,” he says. “For me the best thing has been the experience I’ve picked up. I believe the more you play at a high level, the better you get, and these six starts have shown me that the more I play for England, the better I’ll get. “Apart from the Australia game, as a team we’ve been let down by a lack of clinical finishing. Even against South Africa we were in their 22 for long periods and didn’t come away with anything. At the top level you can’t afford to do that – you have to keep taking your points when you have the opportunities.”Palmer has certainly taken his opportunity this year and should do the same in the Six Nations.last_img read more

 

Six Nations: Saint-Andre adds a pinch of youth to France’s squad

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Perfect 10? Plisson has impressed for Stade this term, but will he be wearing France’s fly-half jersey next month?By Gavin MortimerIS Philippe Saint-Andre finally getting the message? The France coach has relied on the tried and tested since inheriting the squad that somehow stumbled into the World Cup final a little over two years ago, a conservatism encapsulated by his slavish devotion to Frederic Michalak.Pace-setter: Castres full-back PalisBut in naming his 30-man training squad ahead of next month’s Six Nations, Saint-Andre has selected a few welcome surprises. Stade Français’s fine form (the Parisian club are second in the Top 14 behind Clermont) sees them rewarded with the inclusion of three uncapped players – fly-half Jules Plisson, full-back Hugo Bonneval and blindside flanker Antoine Burban. There’s also a first call-up for Castres’ Geoffrey Palis, a goal-kicking full-back whose pace means he can also play on the wing. This column has been singing the praises of the 22-year-old Palis for a while and his inclusion perhaps signals that Saint-Andre now recognizes he needs a goal-kicker other than the traditional scrum-half.Morgan Parra, who falls into that category, is still recovering from a knee injury sustained in November, although the latest medical bulletins to come out of France suggest his rehab is going well and may be fit for most of the Six Nations. Nonetheless Saint-Andre has omitted Parra from his initial squad, along with Fulgence Ouedraogo, Camille Lopez and Florian Fritz, all long-term injury cases. Among those excluded on form are Michalak – unlikely to play again for France it would seem – and the Montpellier half-back duo of Jonathan Pelissie and Francois Trinh-Duc.Pelissie hasn’t managed to sustain his dazzling start to the season (some niggling injuries haven’t helped) while Saint-Andre has never warmed to Trinh-Duc as a fly-half. In many ways the Montpellier 10 is France’s answer to Toby Flood, a player who is comfortable at club-level but who has never found a similar consistency and quality at Test level.So it looks like the No 10 jersey – for so long France’s problem position – will be worn by either Remi Tales of Castres or Plisson. Tales filled the role during France’s November Tests but did little to prove he’s the fly-half France have been looking for. For a start he doesn’t kick goals and his punting from hand was too wayward at Test level. Plisson isn’t a regular goal-kicker either although he’s something of a drop goal specialist. Last season he dropped six for Stade and he’s banged over four this season – including three in the last-gasp win away at Perpignan. Toulon’s fly-half Frederic Michalak leaves the field with his daughter after an European Cup rugby union match between Toulon and Glasgow Warriors on October 13, 2013 at the Mayol stadium in Toulon, southeastern France. AFP PHOTO BERTRAND LANGLOIS (Photo credit should read BERTRAND LANGLOIS/AFP/Getty Images) Backs: Jean-Marc Doussain (Toulouse), Maxime Machenaud (Racing-Métro), Jules Plisson (Stade Français), Rémi Talès (Castres), Mathieu Bastareaud (Toulon), Gaël Fickou (Toulouse), Wesley Fofana (Clermont), Maxime Mermoz (Toulon), Sofiane Guitoune (Perpignan), Yoann Huget (Toulouse), Maxime Médard (Toulouse), Geoffrey Palis (Castres), Hugo Bonneval (Stade Français), Brice Dulin (Castres).Forwards: Thomas Domingo (Clermont), Yannick Forestier (Castres), Benjamin Kayser (Clermont), Dimitri Szarzewski (Racing-Métro), Nicolas Mas (Montpellier), Rabah Slimani (Stade Français), Alexandre Flanquart (Stade Français), Yoann Maestri (Toulouse), Pascal Papé (Stade Français), Sébastien Vahaamahina (Perpignan), Thierry Dusautoir (Toulouse, capt), Bernard Le Roux (Racing-Métro), Yannick Nyanga (Toulouse), Damien Chouly (Clermont), Louis Picamoles (Toulouse). Down and out: Michalak has been excludedSo well is the 22-year-old Plisson playing this season that he’s keeping Morné Steyn out of the Stade starting line-up. His creative talent has never been in doubt but this season the native of Paris has brought a far greater maturity to his game, and he’s grown in confidence since the arrival as coach of Gonzalo Quesada.“Even this morning we were still discussing about Jules Plisson and Francois [Trinh-Duc],” admitted Saint-Andre on Monday. “Francois has put in a huge effort and he was very close [to selection] but Jules Plisson had put in some top quality performances. We’ve gone for those players at the top of their game.”He could also have mentioned how he’s finally trusting in youth.France training squad last_img read more

 

World Cup 2015: Ireland 50-7 Canada

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Man of the Match: Johnny SextonFor the latest Rugby World subscription offers, click here. Ireland wrapped up the bonus point before half-time in their opening World Cup game but could not build on their advantage until late in the second half in the face of stubborn Canadian defence. They finished with a flourish, scoring three tries in the last 15 minutes, but despite running in seven tries they will feel they could have been more precise in capitalising on attacking opportunities.WHAT’S HOTJohnny Sexton – Whether it was pin-perfect kicks to the corner, booting the ball accurately across the field or setting up his back-line to attack with his sharp distribution, the Ireland fly-half was on fire. He even showed his pace when taking an inside ball to sprint for the corner in the first half.Positive mental attitude – Canada may have conceded four tries within 35 minutes, but they kept playing throughout. Not only did they test the Irish line on several occasions, DTH van der Merwe particularly sprightly and going over for a deserved try late on, but their defence held up well for the most part and kept Ireland scoreless for much of the second half.Green army: Ireland fans get into the spirit at the Millennium Stadium. Photo: Getty ImagesIrish support – Ireland’s fans piled into the Millennium Stadium and the noise they generated will have made it feel like a home game for Paul O’Connell & Co. Ireland will be hoping the supporters do the same as the games go on, particularly when they’re back in Cardiff to face France.Iain Henderson – The Ulster lock has been getting better and better over the past few weeks. His performance against Wales earned him a starting berth ahead of Devin Toner against Canada and he certainly made his case for keeping that shirt throughout the tournament. As a ball-carrier he consistently made dents in the Canada defence, barrelling over for a try, while he also made some critical interventions in defence.WHAT’S NOTJamie Cudmore – Canada’s captain may have a reputation as a ‘bad boy’ but he has not lived up to that in recent seasons. However, he will be ruing the yellow card he picked up after 15 minutes for cynical play as Ireland drove for the line. While he was in the sin-bin, the Irish were able to build a big advantage.Seeing yellow: Jamie Cudmore was sent to the sin-bin early on. Photo: Getty ImagesOpportunities missed – Ireland may have secured the bonus point but they will be disappointing they weren’t more clinical. A few inaccurate cross-kicks and bad decisions cost them tries – and they will need to be more ruthless to top Pool D. The number of penalties Ireland conceded will also be a worry for Joe Schmidt.Trains – First Great Western were forced to apologise after fans travelling to Cardiff endured delays and overcrowding on trains. Some supporters reportedly missed kick-off due to the delays and had to rush from the station to the stadium.STATISTICS97 – The percentage of territory Ireland had in the last ten minutes, to go with 96% possession. 137 – The metres made by DTH van der Merwe, the most of any player.10 – The number of turnovers won by Ireland compared to three by Canada.Red-letter day: DTH Van Der Merwe in full flight against Ireland. Photo: Getty ImagesIreland: R Kearney (S Zebo 79); D Kearney J Payne, L Fitzgerald, K Earls; J Sexton (I Madigan 55), C Murray (E Reddan 65); J McGrath (C Healy 61), R Best (S Cronin 61), M Ross (N White 61), I Henderson, P O’Connell (capt, D Ryan 74), P O’Mahony, S O’Brien (C Henry 63), J Heaslip.Tries (7): O’Brien, Henderson, Sexton, D Kearney, Cronin, R Kearney, Payne. Cons: Sexton 3, Madigan 3. Pens: Sexton.Yellow card: O’Connell (42min)Canada: M Evans (L Underwood ht, R Thorpe 75); J Hassler (C Trainor ht), C Hearn, N Blevins, DTH van der Merwe; N Hirayama, G McRorie (P Mack 48); H Buydens (D Sears-Duru 48), R Barkwill (B Piffero 63), D Wooldridge, B Beukeboom, J Cudmore (capt), K Gilmour (J Sinclair 48), J Moonlight, A Carpenter.Try: Van der Merwe. Con: Hirayama.Yellow card: Cudmore (15min).Referee: Glen Jackson (New Zealand)center_img Top performer: Johnny Sexton goes over in the corner for his first-half try. Photo: Getty Images A look back at the highs and lows of Ireland’s bonus-point win over Canada in their opening World Cup gamelast_img read more

 

England’s bench options for Fiji

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Impact sub: Sam Burgess has a good chance of warming England’s bench By Adam HathawayStuart Lancaster has made some hard calls in the last few weeks as he has whittled his squad down from 50 to 39 then to 31 for the World Cup. He has got a few more hard calls to make before the opening match against Fiji on 18 September. This is where the England boss really will earn his corn.As we all know 31 into 23 won’t go and the make-up of the bench will be crucial for every team in the tournament. Get that wrong and you could really be struggling.Getting the right replacements is only half the problem. Using them at the right time is crucial and many games are destroyed as spectacle when both coaches flood the pitch with substitutes in the second half.We are told they have all sorts of data about when players are tired and more prone to injury but Lancaster says he does most of his substitutions on gut coaching instinct.Decision time: Stuart Lancaster says he prefers to go with gut instinct than purely dataI wonder what his gut is telling him about the make-up of his bench for the World Cup.Lancaster just about knows his starting XV for the first game and barring injuries has already said that the same lot will be running out against Wales and Australia.He doesn’t have the luxury that Joe Schmidt or Philippe Saint-Andre have of being able to tinker around with things in his first three matches. He has to get it spot on from the off and, as we are continually told it is a 23-man game nowadays, so the bench is vital.Assuming Lancaster goes with the five forwards and three backs replacement split he employed against Ireland at Twickenham, and not the six-two ratio Bath employ if you-know-who, is on the bench then he has a puzzle to work out.Go forward: Both Ben Morgan and Billy Vunipola give England precious momentumHe has to have three front rowers in there, and a lock, who can cover in the back row, and one of Ben Morgan or Billy Vunipola for their ball-carrying late on.One of the backs will be a scrum-half, probably Richard Wigglesworth, but the other two spots are a conundrum.England are not exactly over-run with the rugby equivalents of David Fairclough, Liverpool’s ‘Super Sub’ of the 1970s, who always seemed to deliver a match-turning goal when he came off the bench. Stuart Lancaster may have a pretty good idea of his starting XV but his wider 23 is more complex. We guage his options for the opener against Fijicenter_img We have seen what Sam Burgess brings – a bit of oomph, some big tackles and not a whole lot else. He does exactly what it says on the tin.Back in 2003 Clive Woodward made one of the most celebrated substitutions of all time when he brought on Mike Catt, for Dan Luger with Mike Tindall moving to the wing, to shepherd Jonny Wilkinson through the quarter-final against Wales in Brisbane.Tried and tested: Owen Farrell has invaluable experience of guiding England homeCatt was a proper footballer and with the best will in the world you can’t imagine Burgess doing a similar job with George Ford.You can imagine him running through a few tired midfields and offloading the ball if England realise they have to have someone right on his shoulder.Henry Slade could bring a bit of footballing nous, the ability to cover 10,12, 13 and 15 and a spot of long-range goal-kicking.But if Slade is on the bench where does that leave Owen Farrell, who closed out the game against Ireland last weekend with two late penalties?Anthony Watson has been running at full-back in training so that probably spells bad news for Alex Goode for the first three weeks at least.And Farrell has too much credit with Lancaster to not be involved in the match day 23, and the England coaches have invested too much time in Burgess recently not to get him on the park at some point. So Slade looks a likely fall guy which is a shame for those of us who prefer a bit of guile to the battering ram.I reckon Lancaster will stick with Farrell and Burgess, but whatever he does he – and his gut – have got to get this one right.last_img read more

 

Five things we learnt: Ireland v Canada

first_imgUnlike, say, the French, Ireland’s bench made a big impact with Sean Cronin, Cian Healy and Ian Madigan particularly bright eyed and bushy-tailed. The game itself was tailor-made for Madigan – coming on against tiring, second-tier opponents with lots of space to give the box of tricks the full outing. Tougher tests lie ahead, but Schmidt has stuck with Madigan as his game-changing closer despite some pretty average form for Leinster, and he continues to produce the goods for Ireland.Bench impact: Ian Madigan made an impression off the bench (Pic Inpho)Taking centre stageWhen Joe Schmidt finalised his RWC squad, Darren Cave was a surprise inclusion – he had an eye-catching warm up series, but has never quite convinced at international level. It turns out Joe Schmidt’s logic was sound – of the specialised centre in the training squad, Gordon D’Arcy was too old, Noel Reid wasn’t ready and other alternatives (Stuart McCloskey, Luke Marshall) were not selected for the audition, so Cave would go as cover for Robbie Henshaw and Jared Payne. All clear? Well, not so much, for when Henshaw got injured, it was Luke Fitzgerald who stepped into the vacant 12 shirt. Fitzgerald’s stop-start international career and his lack of recent game time in that shirt had many worried but he had a sound game, particularly in defence. Fitzgerald is undoubtedly a player with more potential to influence a game at this level, but you have to wonder why a valuable squad choice was spent on Cave if he wasn’t going to be pressed into action.Midfield conundrum: If Luke Fitzgerald was picked at 12, why was Darren Cave included in the squad?Worry. There’s always a worry TAGS: Canada Band of Brothers: Ireland move on with Romania Ireland vs CanadaIreland team at the end of the matchMandatory Credit ©INPHO/Billy Stickland The warm-ups were a bad dream, Ireland’s bench strength and Iain Henderson’s big future are all covered LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS By Whiff of CorditeIreland opened their World Cup 2015 campaign with a comprehensive and sparky hit out over Canada. Ireland were never expected to lose the game, but then we said that about Georgia in 2007!Warm ups…are just warm upsTurns out that warm ups are…um…warm ups after all. Ireland had shown uncharacteristic fragility in defence and more characteristically, an inability to score tries in their summer outings. The nation fretted if the team were undercooked, or whether certain players were carrying injuries. It led to spurious rumour upon spurious rumour, but it turns out they were actually just warming up. Yesterday’s game played at a much higher intensity than in August. Ireland even rolled out a few attacking moves and scored some aesthetically pleasing tries – I know, the horror!Easy on the eye: Ireland cut loose with eight tries against Canada including Dave Kearney (Pic Inpho)Superstar-in-waitingIain Henderson has spent the last two seasons knocking on the door of the Ireland XV without managing to displace Big Dev or Peter O’Mahony, while creating an impact off the bench. In Saturday’s game Henderson announced himself to the world with a barnstorming performance, turning over, hitting hard, carrying with venom, before stepping up and scoring a try. Henderson has few obvious weaknesses and you could see him being one of the breakout stars of the tournament.To the manor born: Iain Henderson has made a big impression for Ireland (Pic Inpho)Impactful bench Ireland’s path to the semi-finals has become a national obsession. Our RWC high water mark. The becomes clearer through winning our pool and avoiding the All Blacks in the quarter-finals. There was both bad and good news from the other tournament games over the weekend. The France-Italy game was the poorest of the weekend, with a litany of errors, no structure or flowing rugby shown by either of the backlines. Both teams look extremely vulnerable to Schmidt-ball with loads of tackles, accurate ruck ball and pre-packaged attacking structures. That, however, would bring up Argentina, who had the All Blacks on the rack for 45 minutes and looked extremely comfortable in their rarefied company. The benefits of four years in the Rugby Championship looked obvious, and Juan Martin-Hernandez picked up where he left off in 2007. While the path to the pool top spot looks solid, for that reason, progressing further just got more precarious.To see all of Rugby World’s latest subscription deals click herelast_img read more

 

Hong Kong sevens: No prize money for winners in 2016

first_img“We didn’t take the decision likely at all and we do appreciate that for nations like Fiji the money is important,” Reid insists. “But in the scheme of things, we decided it was time. We have been the only tournament to pay prize money and perhaps that gave us an edge, but we took the decision that now is the time to finish it.”For the latest Rugby World subscription offers, click here. Guest appearance: The Proclaimers perform on day two of the 2016 Hong Kong sevensThe union did look at removing prize money from the Hong Kong sevens last year, however, with their plans to professionalise their 15s programme still to be fully realised, they still provided a cash prize to last year’s winners, Fiji.With some poorer unions seeing the prize as an ideal way to subsidise their athletes’ income, and with Fiji in particular strong performers every year who had given around 90% of their prize money to the players in 2015 after their victory, it is a decision that may have significant impact on players’ finances. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Cheque please: The Fiji players celebrate winning the 2015 Hong Kong sevens and their cash prize There will be no prize money for the winners of the Cathay Pacific/HSBC Hong Kong sevens this year.Previously, the victors received a winning bonus of US$150k from the host union, but this season the cash prize has been taken off the table.Hong Kong has traditionally been the only leg of the HSBC Sevens World Series to offer a prize to the winners – after beginning the practise in the 80s –but with the Hong Kong Rugby Union investing in other areas of the game, they felt it prudent to cease providing the financial incentive.Vern Reid, CEO of the HKRU, tells Rugby World of the decision: “The situation is now, with the Union, that we have rapidly expanded our operations both professionally – with our full-time 15s squad – and we’ve put a lot more resources into the community. So that, combined with the fact there’s now professional players being paid well on the circuit, plus the opportunity to play in the Olympics and investment into sports institutes to make players better – all those things tell us really that prize money is becoming obsolete.”last_img read more

 

Six Nations: The England team Eddie Jones should pick to face France

first_imgThe England coach has injuries to contend with ahead of the championship but no worry – Adam Hathaway has selected the men he needs for the Twickenham opener The rest of the bench virtually picks itself, although Tommy Taylor is having a decent crack at breaking into the hooker ranks. It is easy to see Haskell starting later in the tournament but after such a long time off he will most likely be a bench bunny against the French. Jones could still pull a rabbit out of the hat, though – he has done that before.For the latest Rugby World subscription offers, click here. Youngs is Jones’s preferred scrum-half – he has started 11 of the 13 games on Fast Eddie’s watch with Danny Care starting twice, both in the Six Nations.Dan Robson, tearing it up at Wasps, was in the 45-man EPS but tellingly not in the 33-man party which had a couple of days’ training in Brighton this month, whilst both Care and Youngs got a trip to the beach and a stick of rock. They will be doing the honours against France.Front row – Ellis Genge, Dylan Hartley (capt) and Dan ColeGenge was omitted from the EPS that Jones announced in December, but with Mako Vunipola and Joe Marler both crocked he should get a look-in. He put in a monstrous display for Leicester against Saracens, in Richard Cockerill’s last game in charge, and an even better one against Wasps a week later. Even though this is throwing him in at the deep end, he looks ready to rumble.With the two first-choice looseheads injured, Ellis Genge is ready to seize his chance (Pic: Getty)Jones has already said that if Hartley is fit and in the 23 he will be captain. That’s bad news for Jamie George but at least the skipper has been wrapped up in cotton wool whilst serving his latest ban. He has previous of coming back to Test rugby after a long lay-off, so his lack of action is not a problem.Cole, who had a wobble at World Cup time, is operating near his best now but is under pressure from Kyle Sinckler, who came off the bench four times in the autumn series.Second row – George Kruis and Joe LaunchburyThis pair have both had injuries recently – Kruis a fractured cheek and Launchbury a calf problem – but they are classy enough to deal with that.Kruis proved it when he played the last part of the autumn after seven weeks out of action and he runs the England lineout. Launchbury has grown into the captaincy at Wasps and with 37 caps under his belt is a no-brainer as we shift Maro Itoje out of the engine room.Courtney Lawes has been in hot form recently as well and was a cigarette paper behind Launchbury.Back row – Maro Itoje, Tom Wood and Nathan HughesWith Chris Robshaw out for the Six Nations, now is the time to try Itoje in the back row, where he has performed superbly for Saracens in the past.Wood can do the job that he did three times in the autumn as a defensive, ball-carrying option at No 7 and he has been in great nick for Northampton a year after seemingly being left on the shelf.No-brainer: With Chris Robshaw absent, Maro Itoje’s physicality must be deployed in the back rowHughes gets lucky here; Billy Vunipola is a huge loss for England and Jack Clifford has been earmarked as a potential No 8 by the boss.James Haskell, the star of the last Six Nations and the first two Tests in Australia, has only just come back from a toe injury and when he did arrive, for Wasps against Leicester on Sunday, he lasted 35 seconds before getting a bang on the head. He is aiming to be fit for Wasps’ final European game against Zebre.Bench – Jamie George, Matt Mullan, Kyle Sinckler, Courtney Lawes, James Haskell, Jack Clifford, Danny Care, Elliot DalyBath’s Nathan Catt is probably unlucky here, Mullan just getting the nod as loosehead replacement, and on current form Genge has leapfrogged the pair of them. TAGS: Highlight Eddie Jones names his squad for the Six Nations on 20 January and he must be wondering which black cat he ran over as the injuries pile up. Jones won the Pat Marshall Memorial Award at the Rugby Union Writers’ Club annual dinner last Monday, for his contributions in 2016, but now he has to really earn his money.First up for his England team are France on 4 February at Twickenham, but who should the coach pick out of those men left standing? The Australian has always talked about England’s strength in depth and with an injury list as long as your arm he will find out all about it in the next couple of months.This time last year Jones said he was “make do and mending” – he is in the same spot now and had better hope his Midas touch hasn’t deserted him. This team could look a lot different when the next World Cup rolls around in 2019 but, as every coach tells us, the next game is the most important…Full-back – Mike BrownBrown is still Jones’s go-to man at full-back and that impression was reinforced when Alex Goode was left out of the Elite Player Squad.Anthony Watson is probably one for the future at No 15 and Jones fancies Elliot Daly back there as well, but for the time being he should stick with the snarling incumbent. Brown has also been one of the team’s vice-captains – alongside Owen Farrell and Billy Vunipola – and is the man for France. But, at 31, he will be looking over his shoulder.Wings – Jack Nowell and Jonny MayWith Anthony Watson on the comeback trial after missing the autumn with a broken jaw, Nowell and May are the likeliest candidates for the wing spots.Flying: Jack Nowell is in brilliant form, scoring this superb try at Saracens last weekend (Pic: Getty)Nowell, who also missed the autumn, has been in top form for Exeter and showcased that with a stunning try against Saracens last weekend and a Man of the Match display against Bath on New Year’s Eve.May played three of the four autumn Tests and has been putting it about for Gloucester, although Watson may have something to say about this selection by the end of the tournament.Jones played Marland Yarde against South Africa and Australia before Christmas but also had a look at Daly on the wing before his red card against Argentina. Semesa Rokoduguni has been blistering in attack for Bath but Jones might not fancy him without the ball.Centres – Jonathan Joseph and Owen FarrellIf it ain’t broke don’t fix it and with so many parts of Jones’s first-choice XV broken, he should not be tampering with this combination.Hunting down: Jonathan Joseph’s defensive talents give him an edge over Elliot Daly at 12 (Pic: Getty)Joseph has been on fire since the autumn and there is a new respect for his defence since the Aussie tour. Farrell has just been Farrell – great defender and organiser, dead-eye kicker and running the Saracens back-line with aplomb, even though it has been from No 10.With the body count running so high, Farrell is one player Jones does not want to see in the casualty ward – he is too important and a world star in the making, if he is not there already.Fly-half – George FordFord’s goal-kicking radar was off beam when Bath played Newcastle in the latest round of the Premiership, but when you’ve got Farrell in the team that is not a problem. Jones has already stated he thinks Ford can be the best player in the world and is not likely to ditch him any time soon.When Daly got sent off against Argentina, it was Ben Youngs, Ford and Farrell who did the organising for playing with 14 men for most of the match and the fly-half is a big voice in the team.Scrum-half – Ben Youngs Decision time: Eddie Jones has changes to make after a succession of injuries (Pic: Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

 

U.K. government launches consultation on same-sex marriage

first_img Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Tags Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Pittsburgh, PA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET U.K. government launches consultation on same-sex marriage Paul Lewis says: Christine Marland says: Youth Minister Lorton, VA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Kurt H. Jacobs says: Rector Belleville, IL An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Robert Ian Williams says: Curate Diocese of Nebraska March 15, 2012 at 5:20 pm I am strongly opposed to the government plans to bring about same sex “marriage”. My reasons are:-1. It is not a marriage since procreation would not be involved.2. It is unnatural since we are clearly male and female and hetersexual relations are natural and others are not.3. It is the opposite of the teaching of the Bible on which this nation has for centuries based its` laws.4. It will bring confusion in future generations.5. It is wanted by a small group of militant people and not by the majority in the UK.6. It will put Christian churches and leaders in a very difficult position in the future despite the supposed safeguards built in. I need to add that Christians have always been at the forefront of healthy social change but the one here suggested is not healthy or helpful to people in our country. I for one would be ashamed to be called British if thus goes through. Rector Smithfield, NC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Comments (8) Director of Music Morristown, NJ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Bath, NC ken blackwell says: By Trevor GrundyPosted Mar 15, 2012 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Washington, DC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Featured Events March 15, 2012 at 7:28 pm As regards Mr. Blackwell’s reason number one:Does this mean that heterosexual couples should be denied the right to marry if the bride is a post-menopausal woman? TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Submit a Job Listing Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Johannes Oesch says: April 7, 2012 at 1:55 am I think Kurt H. Jacobs said it well, when he pointed out the change that society has experienced in terms of scientific and sociological awareness of various developments. Too often we forget that culture is not static, and neither is the realm of ethics when we are faced with new and complex problems as greater knowledge emerges. I support any inspiration that people can extract from the Bible, or any religious source, so long as that inspiration is aligned with the fundamental values that all religions preach: love, acceptance, mutual understanding, respect, peace.We should also remember that being a highly intelligent species, human behaviour moves far beyond instinctual needs of survival and procreation. So much of what we do is for mental challenge, “order,” pleasure. To conclude that sex was only meant for producing offspring is to undermine the ability that humans have to feel and enjoy such exchanges while taking active measures to reduce the likelihood of pregnancy. Furthermore, as John Warfel joked, if we are to presume that marriage is for the possibility of procreation, that should therefore shut out all post-menopausal women, and anyone sterile. Excluding people from enjoining in a legal and socially recognized union of marriage should raise the question of how alienating a world that would be.In response to Christine Marland’s concern for confusing children, who witness or grow up in same-sex environments, about their sexuality, let us also consider that humans are both physiologically and sociologically shaped. Perhaps the real reason there seem to be fewer gay or lesbian, or bisexually self-identified persons is not because humans lack the capacity to desire and form meaningful relationships with persons of the same sex, but because it has been shunned for so many centuries, and thus, humans have not explored their fullest capacity for love. I hear your concern that being anything but purely “straight” (if there really is such a thing…I have my doubts) can bring undue hardship, and to that I agree. But I agree only to the fault of our own for the practice of social discrimination by choice. If more people opened their hearts and minds to the positive effect same-sex marriage and same-sex relationships can have, acknowledging the idea that they have the capacity to be long-lasting, unselfish, and meaningful on multiple levels, we would no longer need to worry about this so-called hardship self-imposed.The biggest thing we need to overcome is the idea that we are incapable of greater awareness of ourselves and of others. If we accept this, it all of a sudden becomes fathomable that the past is not necessarily “better” in all respects, and that the law must respond to our advances if it is to stay in tune with the needs of its communities and attempt to be “just.” [Ecumenical News International] The U.K. government on March 15 launched a 12-week consultation in England and Wales that is widely expected to lead to the legalization of same-sex marriage, despite strong opposition from the Roman Catholic Church and conservative elements within the Church of England.“Should two people who care deeply for each other, who love each other and who want to spend the rest of their lives together be allowed to marry?” Home Secretary Theresa May asked in The Times on March 15.“That is the essential question behind the debate over the government’s plans to extend civil marriage to same-sex couples,” she said.The coalition government led by Prime Minister David Cameron (Conservative) and his deputy, Nick Clegg (Liberal Democrat) has made it clear that it wants to see a law which allows gays and lesbians to marry before the next general election in 2015. It is also supported by the opposition leader, Ed Milliband (Labour).But the consultation also will include an option of retaining the status quo and that has met with the approval of senior church figures, as well as a number of Conservative Members of Parliament.The plans for same-sex weddings only covers civil marriages for gay and lesbian couples. Religious buildings would only be used where church, temple, mosque or synagogue leaders wished to offer that ceremony.If the reform goes ahead, it would only affect same-sex couples in England and Wales, not Northern Ireland or Scotland (which make up the rest of the U.K.). Last year, the Scottish Government held its own consultation process and received more than 50,000 responses.The decision to go ahead with the consultation was taken despite fierce opposition from Christian church leaders. The Church of England on March 15 issued a statement saying that the Church of England/Archbishops’ Council will study the government’s consultation on whether to redefine marriage and respond in due course.“The Church of England is committed to the traditional understanding of the institution of marriage as being between one man and one woman,” a statement said.On March 11, Roman Catholic priests read out a pastoral letter signed by two leading clerics, the Archbishop of Westminster Vincent Nichols and the Archbishop of Southwark Peter Smith.It warned Britain’s estimated four million Roman Catholics that “changing the legal definition of marriage could be a profoundly radical step. Its consequences should be taken seriously.” The letter was read by priests from 2,500 pulpits in churches across England and Wales.Earlier, Cardinal Keith O’Brien, the leader of Scotland’s estimated 500,000 Roman Catholics, described as “grotesque” plans for same-sex weddings. He said if a law was passed making same-sex weddings legal it would “shame the United Kingdom in the eyes of the world.”The Archbishop of Canterbury and leader of the 77-million strong worldwide Anglican Communion, Rowan Williams, has cautioned that the law should not be used as a tool to bring about social changes, such as gay marriage.But other religious groups, including Quakers, Reform Jews and Unitarians, have welcomed it.Several countries recognize same-sex marriage, including Argentina, Belgium, Canada, Iceland, Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Sweden, Spain, and South Africa. In the U.S., same-sex marriage is legal in eight states.Civil partnerships were introduced in the United Kingdom in 2005. They gave same-sex couples the same legal rights as married couples. Those in favor of same-sex marriage say it would lift another barrier to equality and give gays and lesbians the same rights as those enjoyed by heterosexual couples. Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Knoxville, TN Featured Jobs & Calls March 17, 2012 at 4:32 pm I am a Conservative and CofE church goer. I had a civil marriage but not a church marriage. I feel marriage is a word that has been used for committment between a man and a woman, and that it includes a possibility of children from that marriage and this is how the word has been used for centuries by society. Today civil partnerships give same sex couples the rights they need in law. In my view this is sufficient. Society across the world and historically recognises men and women together in marriage provide the stabiity and the model of male and female behaviour that gives their offspring the easiest route in today’s world to a happy, non-confrontational adulthood in society.Like unmarried mums, same sex couples bringing up children have a harder path to bringing up children who are at ease with the general rules of society. If society has too many unmarried mums and too many same sex couples bringing up children – it could cause distress and confusion to young minds who might think that it was a route they should take lightly and not realise that it can have many disadvantages. I understand that people do not choose to be homosexual and also that they can have committed lives to members of the same sex. I also believe society in general should not automatically think that two women or two men who have lived together for many years have automatically a sexual relationship with each other. They could be together for the very real needs of security and companionship. Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs March 16, 2012 at 3:03 am The Anglican communion unwittingly changed its view of marriage when it accepted contraception at its 1930 Lambeth Conference., having previously condemned it. from 1930 onwards Anglicanism saw sexual love within marriage as primarily recreational and procreation as optional. Most Protestant churches and the Orthodox churches followed and only the Roman Catholic Church has remained consistent.Please also observe that the so-called “conservative” elements within the Church of England opposing gay marriage are liberal on divorce and re-marriage. Lord Carey, who has called gay marriage “vandalism,” introduced divorce and re-marriage to the Church of England, and now it is a free for all, dependent on the whim of the officiating cleric. March 24, 2012 at 11:39 am “Should two people who care deeply for each other, who love each other and who want to spend the rest of their lives together be allowed to marry?” Home Secretary Theresa May asked in The Times on March 15.If this to set the new rule, it makes me think about the new German Federal President. He is married, but lives separated from his – as yet still – official wife. On the other hand he brings along into the office a First Lady, to whom he is related in love for more than a decade, caring for each other, wanting to spend the rest of their lives together. Shouldn’t these two people be allowed to marry? without any prejudice to the former wife? Rector Shreveport, LA Benita Ann says: Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Anglican Communion, Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 March 15, 2012 at 12:44 pm On a factual note the suggested change in the law would not allow any religious buildings to be used for same sex marriage. The intention is to apply it to civil marriage only (hotels, town halls etc) as the article states. It does not allow for a religious same sex marriage in a designated place of worship even if groups wish to hold them. One or two MPs have suggested they might put forward an amendment to provide that facility for those groups mentioned in the article who may wish to offer this service to people. Submit an Event Listing Comments are closed. Rector Martinsville, VA March 15, 2012 at 7:22 pm I would like to respond to Ken Blackwell’s comments to this article:1. Mr. Blackwell says “It is not marriage since procreation is not involved,” but heterosexual couples are married all the time when one or both are beyond the age of giving birth; younger heterosexual couples who do not intend to have children also marry each other; and heterosexual couples who cannot have children together nonetheless remain married and adopt children, or not, just as many same-sex couples adopt children. The love between two people goes well beyond, and indeed may include, procreation.2. Same-sex physical and romantic attraction clearly is quite “natural”; it is compelled by the same forces compelling different-sex attraction, which explains why it is found in all human societies, and throughout history.3. The concept homosexuality — that is, of having a sexual orientation towards one’s own, rather than the “opposite” sex — developed in the 1800s, which is why the word “homosexual” itself originates in the 1800s. Look it up in the Oxford English Dictionary. That is why there is absolutely no mention of a person having a same sex orientation in the Bible, just as there is no mention in the Bible of automobiles, or how to have a root canal, or a thousand other things. There is also no mention of DNA or genes or genetics in the Bible, so it does violence to the interpretation of scripture to suggest otherwise.4. Future generations will wonder why it took us so long to adopt same-sex marriage and what the fuss was about, just as we scratch our heads that it took our ancestors until 700 A.D. and 800 A.D. in some cases to conclude that in “trial by combat” the bigger guy usually won even he was the ne’er do well. Even then, “trial by combat” was replaced with an oath system that determined who was right or wrong by how many people one could get on one’s side to take an oath for you. It took many more centuries after that to come up with the idea of “witnesses” and “evidence” and impartial juries.5. Time will certainly tell whether it is wanted by a majority in the U.K. Since every citizen of the U.K. is related by blood to a gay man or gay woman, it is not hard to imagine that a majority of citizens in the U.K. may favor permitting gay marriages.6. Permitting gay marriage is “healthy social change” and should, after prayerful consideration, be supported by Christians, just as many Christians, though not all, supported an end to slavery, an end to child labor, permitting blacks and whites to marry, etc. It is unhealthy to discriminate against gay people and prevent them from enjoying the blessings of love set out in Corinthians. Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Submit a Press Release John Warfel says: Press Release Service Rector Collierville, TN Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Tampa, FL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Human Sexuality last_img
 

Justin Welby, obispo de Durham, nombrado el 105º. arzobispo de…

first_img Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing Director of Music Morristown, NJ The Rt. Rev. Justin Welby. Photo/Bishop Auckland[Episcopal News Service] Luego de meses de expectativa y especulación de los medios de prensa, la oficina del Primer Ministro británico confirmó el 9 de noviembre que la Reina había aprobado la nominación de Justin Welby, obispo de la Diócesis de Durham como el 105º. Arzobispo de Cantórbery.Como el 105º. Arzobispo, en una sucesión que se extiende por más de 1400 años, Welby asumirá el papel multifacético de líder espiritual de la Comunión Anglicana, Primado de toda Inglaterra y obispo de la Diócesis de Cantórbery.Los obispos de la Iglesia de Inglaterra son nombrados en lugar de ser electos, [mediante un proceso] en el cual los 16 miembros de la Comisión de Nominaciones de la Corona (http://www.archbishopofcanterbury.org/articles.php/2403/outline-of-procedures-for-the-appointment-of-an-archbishop-of-canterbury) somete dos nombres —un candidato favorito y un segundo candidato— a la oficina del Primer Ministro del Reino Unido, quien luego busca la aprobación del monarca británico, que es el supremo gobernador de la Iglesia de Inglaterra.Antes de su ordenación al presbiterado en 1992, Welby estudio derecho e historia en la Universidad de Cambridge y luego pasó 11 años como ejecutivo de la industria petrolera. Después de una década en el ministerio parroquial, fue nombrado canónigo residente, y luego subdeán de la catedral de Coventry. Fue deán de la catedral de Liverpool de 2007 a 2011.Como obispo de Durham, la cuarta sede en orden jerárquico de la Iglesia de Inglaterra, a la cual fue consagrado en octubre de 2011, Welby accedió automáticamente a un escaño en la Cámara de los Lores.Welby, de 56 años, sucederá al Rvdmo. Rowan Williams, quien abandonará el cargo a fines de este año luego de haber servido como 104º. Arzobispo de Cantórbery desde febrero de 2003. Williams ha aceptado un nuevo cargo como director del Colegio de la Magdalena en Cambridge.La entronización de Welby, como el 105º. Arzobispo de Cantórbery tendrá lugar el 21 de marzo de 2013, en la catedral de Cantórbery.Welby es casado con Caroline y tiene cinco hijos, de 16 a 27 años de edad.“No creo que nadie pueda estar más sorprendido que yo del resultado de este proceso”, dijo Welby, según un comunicado de prensa del Palacio de Lambeth. “Ha sido una experiencia el leer más acerca de mí de lo que yo mismo sabía. Ser nominado a Cantórbery es, al mismo tiempo, abrumador y asombroso. Es abrumador debido a aquellos a los que sigo y la responsabilidad que conlleva. Es asombroso porque es algo que nunca había esperado que ocurriera.“Una de las cosas más difíciles será dejar a Durham. Trabajo con un grupo de magníficos colegas y de notables clérigos y laicos. Es una parte impresionante del país, uno en el que como familia habíamos pensado vivir durante muchos años. La gente es franca, inspiradora y maravillosamente amistosa. De muchas maneras ha sido la antigua cuna del cristianismo británico. Es un lugar de oportunidades e incluso con un futuro más grande aún que su pasado”.[El arzobispo] Williams dijo estar “encantado con el nombramiento… He tenido el privilegio de trabajar estrechamente con [Welby] en varias ocasiones y siempre he salido enriquecido y animado por la experiencia.“Tiene una extraordinaria gama de talentos y es persona de gentileza, paciencia, sabiduría y humor. Aportará a este cargo una rica experiencia pastoral y un agudo sentido de las prioridades internacionales, para la Iglesia y para el mundo. Le deseo —con Carolina y la familia— toda suerte de bendiciones, y espero que la Iglesia de Inglaterra y la Comunión Anglicana compartirán mi regocijo por este nombramiento y lo apoyarán con sus oraciones y su afecto”.La obispa primada Katharine Jefferts Schori dijo: “Me ha encantado enterarme del nombramiento del obispo Welby como arzobispo de Cantórbery. Él aporta el conocimiento de los inmensos desafíos del mundo en que la Comunión anglicana procura actuar en el servicio de la misión restauradora y reconciliadora de Dios”.Jefferts Schori destacó que Welby tiene experiencia de las iglesias en varias partes de la Comunión Anglicana, “lo cual le resultará útil. Los obispos de la Iglesia Episcopal lo conocemos y hemos compartido con el una conversación fructífera, [así como] el culto y el aprendizaje durante una reunión de la Cámara de Obispos a principios de este año. También lo recibimos en nuestra Convención General en 2009.“Doy gracias por este nombramiento y por su disposición a aceptar este trabajo, en el cual sus dones de reconciliación y discernimiento quedarán sobradamente demostrados. Que Dios bendiga su ministerio, proteja a su familia y le brinde consuelo en medio de los difíciles criterios y decisiones que ha de tomar a solas”.— Traducción de Vicente Echerri. Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Albany, NY An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska Justin Welby, obispo de Durham, nombrado el 105º. arzobispo de Cantórbery Rev. 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VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA November 10, 2012 at 12:27 pm Dios guie y bendiga al nuevo primado y todos vean unidad pese a la diversidad en la Comunion Anglicana Episcopal! Una Iglesia unida. Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Smithfield, NC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Martinsville, VA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI center_img Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Comments (1) Submit a Press Release Featured Events Comments are closed. 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You can change the world, Archbishop Welby tells young Christians

first_img By Lambeth Palace staffPosted Aug 2, 2013 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Youth Minister Lorton, VA Archbishop of Canterbury, Youth & Young Adults Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Stewart David Wigdor says: August 3, 2013 at 1:36 pm There us a relationship in the Church for a secret agent, with a license to save life wherever he goes not to take life. This is possible by coming from God, Grace, and Lord. The greatest gift of human life is to be revealed the Knowledge of God within the heart for the Kingdom of God is within us. As people decide what is the rights of the individual both in law and in ministry; how to present themselves to society; we have to ask ourselves what makes us human at all? Why are we human? And that answer is to know your God for He created the earth for you to play in it and He left His Church on earth for us to worship Him and enjoy that pursuit to His Throne which is Heaven. Thus if youth wants to aspire, aspire to be a lover of your Lord. Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Tags Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Albany, NY Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Smithfield, NC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Anglican Communion, Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Knoxville, TN center_img Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Comments are closed. Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Bath, NC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Comments (1) Associate Rector Columbus, GA Photo: Graham Howard[Lambeth Palace] Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby told young Christians this week that while it is “easy to feel very alone,” they are part of “a community” which will strengthen them to change the world.The archbishop was visiting the Anglo-Catholic Shrine of Our Lady of Walsingham, Norfolk, where he joined hundreds of young people attending its annual youth pilgrimage.At a Mass which was part-led by a youth group, Welby said young Christians needn’t feel alone.“Jesus gives us a community, a family, and we need to know we belong to it and to share in it,” he said.“Because the more we are part of his family, which is the church, the stronger we are and the more we can live to change the world.”‘You’re forgiven, I’m forgiven’During the Mass, the archbishop said the cross symbolizes the forgiveness which is the “supreme truth of being a Christian.”“None of us has a life where we don’t make wrong choices, where we don’t hurt other people, and where we’re not hurt by other people, and the world around us,” he said.But he added that the biggest thing Christians need to learn is that God forgives them.“Most of us still carry around a good deal of guilt in our lives. And the thing we struggle with is that someone who we’ve never seen loves each one of us enough to forgive us.“There isn’t a single person in here who finds that easy to get. But it is the supreme truth of being a Christian. You’re forgiven, I’m forgiven. And we each need it,” he said.The archbishop added that it is “very easy as Christians today to feel very alone. We feel we’ve got to deal with it all ourselves.”But drawing a contrast with James Bond – which was the theme of this year’s pilgrimage – the archbishop said being a Christian was “the exact opposite” of having to save the world single-handedly.“Jesus gives us a community, a family, and we need to know we belong to it and to share in it,” he said.“Because the more we are part of his family, which is the Church, the stronger we are and the more we can live to change the world.”He continued: “God came and lived a holy human life, died on the cross, was raised from the dead, sent his Holy Spirit and gives us a job to do. It’s the most exciting thing. It’s the most extraordinary thing. We have a job, a mission, for Jesus. There’s a mission for each of us, and we need to know it.”Con-celebrating Mass with the archbishop, Father Stephen Gallagher said those present at Walsingham had been “strengthened” by his visit.“It’s a very beautiful thing that so early on in his time as an archbishop he asked to come to be at this youth pilgrimage. It’s a wonderful thing and we’ve been blessed by his willingness to come and by the things he has shared with us,” he said.Gallagher then led a prayer for Welby, offering “our fraternal love to this spiritual Father and Brother” and asking God to “give him courage to speak your Word.”Giving thanks for the prayer, Welby asked the young people to keep praying for him, especially “when I fail.”“One of the changes we can make in the church that will change our church is when we see brothers and sisters in Christ get things wrong – and I will – rather than just dismiss them out of hand, we love them and pray for them.“So I ask for your prayers constantly, but above all when I fail,” he said.The previous evening Archbishop Justin led a candlelit procession to the Shrine, walking barefoot along the Holy Mile with crowds of young people as they held banners and sang worship songs.In a moving scene, he then gave Benediction to young pilgrims as they knelt silently with candles before the Shrine.During his visit to the youth pilgrimage, Welby also led several hundred young people in a Bible study session on St. John’s account of the crucifixion.The administrator of the Shrine of Our Lady of Walsingham, the Rt. Rev. Lindsay Urwin, said over recent years a big effort has been made to make Walsingham a place where “young people can be welcomed as young people.”He said: “At this particular pilgrimage we seek to present the gifts of the church in a place which is living 24-7 as if God is true. In some of these parishes, young people are being constantly bombarded with secular messages not only about God but about themselves. And when they come here and give it a chance, we fail, but 24-7 we’re living from a sacred perspective. And this can open young people to a different possibility of how the world is, and the way life is, and the way they are.“We want them to view themselves as sacred. It’s not just about statues and even sacraments. It’s also for them to discover that they are sacred in the core… they are made for a sacred life,” he said.A picture gallery of Welby’s visit to Walsingham is available here. 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