The Disco Biscuits Kick Off Washington D.C. Run With 9:30 Club Show [Full Video]

first_imgThe Disco Biscuits began their two-night run in Washington D.C. at the legendary 9:30 Club on Friday (January 12th). The show got 2018 off on the right foot for the band, as they dropped some of their most beloved songs like “Morph Dusseldorf” and impressed fans with tight transitions through inverted versions of “Digital Buddha”, “The Overture”, and “About the Waves.”The atmosphere in the venue quickly transitioned from immense anticipation to complete awe when the Biscuits opened with an intense, energetic “Shem Rah Boo” sandwich, during which Marc Brownstein showcased his ability to hold together the group. The Biscuits were relentless as they segued seamlessly into one song after the next, with Jon “Barber” Gutwillig dialed in on the guitar and Aron Magner ceaselessly stimulating the senses on keys and synthesizers.The second set was essentially one comprehensive “Morph Dusseldorf” sandwich with the inverted “Abraxas” being an unquestionable highlight of the set. The entire show was a non-stop immersive dance party, and the band rarely came up for air. The incredible, unceasing segues throughout coupled with the “Bazaar Escape” encore left everyone with their jaws on the floor and minds in the sky.Tonight (January 13th), Biscuits will be making their debut at The Anthem, D.C.’s newest music venue which is coincidentally owned by the 9:30 Club’s parent company, I.M.P. Productions. If Friday night was any indication of what Biscuits have in store for night two, they are about to break The Anthem in proper and burn down the house.[Video: The Disco Biscuits]Setlist: The Disco Biscuits | 9:30 Club | Washington D.C. | 1/12/2018Set One: Shem Rah Boo > Digital Buddha (inverted) > The Overture (inverted) > Shem Rah Boo, Little Betty Boop > The Champions > Little Betty BoopSet Two: Morph Dusseldorf > Abraxas (inverted) > Rock Candy > Cyclone > Above the Waves (inverted) > Morph DusseldorfEncore: Bazaar Escape[Photo: Brady Cooling]last_img read more

 

Widespread Panic Delivers Three Sets, Busts Out “Puppy Sleeps” At Red Rocks Night 2 [Videos]

first_imgPhoto: Bill McAlaine Load remaining images Following a glorious first night, Widespread Panic resumed their musical annihilation at Red Rocks Ampitheatre in Morrison, Colorado with an epic evening of heaters throughout a rare three-set show. Everyone approached their instrument with their customary, subtle demeanors and gave no indication of the conflagration that was about to be ignited. Once again, the intense heat from the direct sunlight gave way to a cool, breezy night on the rocks.Jimmy Herring was the first to attack during set one in a lively rendition of “Rebirtha” but it wasn’t long before JoJo Hermann took over on keys for an intoxicating “Blackout Blues”. The band was firing on all cylinders when John Bell commandeered the show with his powerful vocals during “Little Kin”, which segued into an electrifying “Radio Child.” A mellow “C. Brown” was welcomed warmly by the crowd and John Bell continued to mystify vocally.“Tickle the Truth” was performed for the first time since April 2017. John Bell vocalized a sly introduction in his usual dogged manner, but JoJo and Jimmy also had pristine solos. After School’s bass line teased the beginning of “Stop-Go”, the crowd went nuts until he continued to hammer out the well-known bottom notes to this beloved tune from the Panic’s debut album. The entire band gelled beautifully throughout this filthy jam with each musician playing their parts flawlessly, while Schools stood out in the forefront with his relentless assault on bass. The musicians segued seamlessly into a funky “Weight of the World” which featured John Bell on slide guitar. The first set ended in triumphant blues fashion with a dirty version of Howlin’ Wolf’s “Taildragger.”After a short set break, the band kept the pedal to the floor with a scorchin’ cover of Jerry Joseph’s “North.” To continue the musical devastation, the boys followed with David Bromberg’s circus tune “Sharon.” The carnival anthem enticed the audience with everyone singing the well-known lyrics “The same rowdy crowd that was here last night, is back again!” The jaunty beat of “Sell Sell” emerged with a smokin’ Herring guitarwork running rampant throughout the jam.JoJo Herrmann’s keys introduced “Good People” to the setlist. Hermann’s keys paired with Herring’s guitar and John Bell got extra provocative with his saucy vocals. The tune featured several tempo and melody breakdowns that the band handled with casual ease. Dave Schools pounded out the beginning of “Second Skin” which culminated into a tremendously energetic jam. Jimmy Herring cast haunted acoustic spells upon the audience and John Bell continued to mystify with his faultless ethereal vocals. This song ended a short 48-minute set which was halted early to give the stage crew time to take down a LED screen that threatened to fly free with the increasingly heavy winds.Coming back strong, the band returned to execute a jamtastic version of “Greta” with all the bells, whistles, and yellow rabbits involved. The drummers segued suavely into the percussive rhythms of “Cease Fire” keeping the intensity at full blast with this eerily, mystical banger from their most recent album Street Dogs. The boys then transitioned into another crowd favorite, “Blue Indian” from Til’ the Medicine Takes. The ravenous audience consumed these treats and reciprocated the band’s energy back towards the stage with their voices and a wide range of dance moves.The folky upswing guitar riffs revealed “Holden Oversoul” as the next song. JoJo’s organ remained omnipresent, while Bell and Herring were on fire. Just as the excitement and energy didn’t seem to be raised any higher, the band busted out a bass-heavy “Puppy Sleeps” for the first time since April 2002 in Asheville, North Carolina. Featured on Brute’s Co-Balt, the song was co-written by Vic Chestnutt and Dave Schools. Schools made it well-known that it was his song with supporting vocals and a stompin’ bass. Jimmy Herring went full-blown electric wizard and the energy became palpable.Slowing it down, the boys delved into another cut from Co-Balt with the sentimental Chestnutt cover “Expiration Date”. To finish off an exultant third set, Panic delivered a frenzied “Flat Footed Flewzy” that left the crowd foaming at the mouth.With a long night of three sets of music, the band presented “Porch Song” as the solo encore to end an extensive second night. The boys scorched through the entire setlist and show no sign of slowing down for the last show of the run tonight. Never miss a Sunday show! Catch y’all on the rocks. Happy birthday Otis, you sonuvabitch.RebirthaNorthPuppy Sleeps[Video: MrTopDogger]Setlist: Widespread Panic | Red Rocks Amphitheatre | Morrison, CO | 6/23/18I: Rebirtha > Blackout Blues, Little Kin > Radio Child, C. Brown, Tickle The Truth, Stop Go > Weight of the World, Tail DraggerII: North, Sharon, Sell Sell, Good People, Second SkinIII: Greta > Cease Fire > Blue Indian, Holden Oversoul, Puppy Sleeps, Expiration Day, Flat Foot FlewzyEncore: Porch SongWidespread Panic | Red Rocks Amphitheatre | Morrison, CO | 6/23/18 | Photos: Bill McAlainelast_img read more

 

The Grateful Dead Make Their ‘Saturday Night Live’ Debut, On This Day In 1978 [Watch]

first_imgThe Grateful Dead were well into the second major chapter of their “Long Strange Trip” by the time they performed on “Saturday Night Live” for the first time on this day back in 1978. The counterculture staples were still relatively passed-over by mainstream audiences at the time, but the new sketch comedy show was already a staple in weekend schedules for Americans TV viewers by the time it began its fourth season in the fall of that year.The band started off their first appearance at the storied Studio 8H at 30 Rockefeller Plaza the fan-favorite “Casey Jones” from their 1970 album, Workingman’s Dead. They would also return later on in the episode to play “I Need A Miracle” and “Good Lovin’” from their then-forthcoming Shakedown Street LP, which would be officially released just a few days later on November 15th, 1978. Looking back at the comedy show’s equally long and wild history, it’s only fitting that the first lyrics Jerry Garcia would ever sing on the show be, “Driving that train/High on cocaine.”The Dead served as the official musical guest for the fifth episode of the show’s fourth season, hosted by none other than the infamous serial ‘SNL’ host Buck Henry, who co-wrote the screenplay for “The Graduate” in 1967. At that time, the show still boasted an impressive roster of early cast members including Dan Aykroyd, Gilda Radner, John Belushi and Bill Murray, just to name a few. The show’s wildly fun cast of comedians mixed in with the Dead’s Weir, Kreutzmann and Garcia surely must have made for quite the memorable wine and cheese party backstage. Presumably, hilarity ensued. Sadly for audiences, Belushi didn’t cartwheel his way up to the microphone to join them in singing the chorus as he was known to do from time to time back then.Video of the band’s performance can be seen below with Garcia playing his famous “Wolf” guitar while Bob Weir strums alongside him, making use of his slide. Speaking of Weir, shoutout to Bobby for showing off his pants-tucked-into-socks look for national television. Looking fresh Bobby! Footage of the old episode looks and sound pretty good, even for 70s television standards. You can watch “Casey Jones” from the Grateful Dead’s first SNL appearance below:Grateful Dead – Saturday Night Live – 11/11/1978[Video: Dr. Shrimp Puerto Rico]last_img read more

 

Brandi Carlile Performs Acoustic “The Joke” On Ellen Following Buzzed-About Grammys Performance [Watch]

first_imgOn Thursday, critical darling Brandi Carlile stopped by Ellen for a performance of her acclaimed By The Way, I Forgive You single, “The Joke”. The Ellen performance came just days after Carlile nabbed three statues at the 61st Annual Grammy Awards including wins for “Best American Roots Performance” and “Best American Roots Song” for “The Joke” and a “Best Americana Album” recognition for By The Way, I Forgive You.Brandi’s Ellen performance gave fans a new kind of look at her multiple Grammy-winning track, as she opted to perform it as a solo acoustic number rather than with her full band. She also sat down with host Ellen DeGeneres for a brief interview, during which she spoke about how Ellen inspired her to come out of the closet at age 14 and acknowledged her appreciation for her current mainstream success and acceptance. You can check out the performance and interview below.Brandi Carlile – “The Joke” [Solo Acoustic], Interview [Video: TheEllenShow]In addition to winning three awards at the Grammys, Brandi Carlile delivered one of the most talked-about performances of the star-studded evening with her full-band rendition of “The Joke”—quite a different reading from the one she gave on Ellen. You can watch Brandi Carlile’s incredible performance at the Grammys below.Brandi Carlile – “The Joke” [Grammys Performance][Video: Brandi Carlile]Brandi Carlile is also preparing to head out on a major North American tour this spring and summer featuring stops at a number of high-profile festivals and venues nationwide. For a full list of Brandi Carlile’s upcoming tour dates, head to her website here.last_img read more

 

Chris Robinson Brotherhood Announces New Album, ‘Servants Of The Sun’, Shares First Single [Listen]

first_imgOn Tuesday, Chris Robinson Brotherhood announced the coming release of their new studio album, Servants of the Sun, due out on June 14th via Silver Arrow Records.The new record marks the band’s sixth full-length release since their formation in 2011. While previous CRB records have taken a more exploratory, studio-centric approach, Servants of the Sun is “their most direct, bare bones, rock and roll offering since debut companion albums Big Moon Ritual and The Magic Door.”As Chris Robinson explains in a press release, “I let my head go to a Saturday night at The Fillmore, and said, ‘what’s the best set we could play?’ The record was conceived from that starting point. With our last couple of albums we made songs we knew we probably weren’t going to play live. This time around every one of these songs will fall into the live repertoire.”“The best thing about the CRB after all this time is that no matter what we’re going through, when there’s a new piece of music that everyone is interested in, the entire band gets in there and goes for it,” continues Robinson.The album captures Robinson and company hurtling between the fire and mania of Saturday night and the bruises and rain-on-the-bus-window reflection of the cold Sunday morning dawn. As the announcement notes, “Beyond the bullet holes, red-eyed angry angels, alchemy, praying mantises, hangovers, and all other manner of cosmic debris gone lyrically airborne—love is lost, new love is found, relationships are bent and broken by distance and time or by unrelenting proximity and timelessness. All the while, the line between autobiography and psychedelic fantasy is completely blurred.”“I like to write ‘scenes.’ I want you to be able to storyboard these lyrics into a visual, even the abstract part of them,” says Robinson. “We’re creating a world and we want people to come in. We’re doing it through language and this texture of music and melody. Sometimes it’s a celebration, sometimes its mourning. It can be anything once you get inside.”Below, you can listen to the first single from Servants of the Sun, “Comin’ Round The Mountain”:Chris Robinson Brotherhood – “Comin’ Round The Mountain”[Video: Chris Robinson Brotherhood]Check out a full tracklisting for Chris Robinson Brotherhood’s forthcoming album, Servants of the Sun, below. For a list of the band’s upcoming tour dates, head to their website here.Chris Robinson Brotherhood – Servants of the Sun – Tracklisting1. Some Earthly Delights2. Let It Fall3. Rare Birds4. Venus In Chrome5. Stars Fell On California6. Comin’ Round The Mountain7. The Chauffeur’s Daughter8. Dice Game9. Madder Rose Interlude10. A Smiling EpitaphView Tracklistinglast_img read more

 

Help from Shore

first_imgYasuko Nagasaka sees a future where ambulances are equipped with tanks of a gas that, when inhaled during heart attacks, will dramatically cut the nearly 50 percent death rate.In that future, the tanks would contain nitric oxide, found widely today everywhere from automobile exhaust pipes to the human body. Not to be confused with nitrous oxide — the familiar laughing gas of dental-surgery lore — nitric oxide is chemically simpler, with just one nitrogen atom, and very reactive. It lasts under a second in the body before it combines with other atoms, including the potentially harmful oxygen compounds that arise during a heart attack.Nagasaka’s vision will take enormous amounts of hard work: She will need to conduct research as a principal investigator even as she takes on teaching duties and juggles responsibilities at home, where she is a single mother to two children, ages 11 and 7.“It has been challenging for me to work as a researcher on a full-time basis, in a foreign country where there is no family or friends to help,” said Nagasaka, who came to Harvard-affiliated Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) from Japan in 2005 and who is now an instructor in anesthesia at Harvard Medical School (HMS) and in MGH’s Department of Anesthesia and Critical Care. “My work requires a considerable amount of time being physically present in the laboratory.”The crushing squeeze of work and family is a familiar one in the medical research field. Young faculty members not only have to prove themselves in the laboratory during these years, but also have to juggle teaching, patient care, grant-writing, publication, and family duties. In 1995, Harvard Medical School began a special fellowship program aimed at easing these difficult years, especially for women, who often bear a greater share of responsibilities at home.The Eleanor and Miles Shore 50th Anniversary Fellowship Program for Scholars in Medicine awarded 61 fellowships of at least $25,000 this year to lend a hand to Nagasaka and to others like her.The fellowships don’t convey the ability to be in two places at once, but they can be used to hire help — in the lab or at home — to ease the need to be so. They also can be used to opt out of clinical responsibilities to gain time for research or grant-writing, to help a new lab get its footing, or for other purposes.Nagasaka, who received her M.D. and Ph.D. degrees from the Tokyo Women’s Medical College, will use the fellowship for her science, where the grant will help her begin to gain independence as a researcher at MGH.If Nagasaka can fully unearth nitric oxide’s heart-helping effects, in coming years emergency workers might administer the gas to heart-attack sufferers, letting the compound traverse the lungs and travel to the heart. Once there, it would reduce the damage. However, the precise downstream effects of inhaled nitric oxide on the injured heart remain to be elucidated. Nagasaka will tackle this question with her laboratory team and the aid of a Shore fellowship.There’s real reason to think this future could become a reality. Nagasaka is researching nitric oxide’s effects in a pioneering MGH lab that has made other strides with this gas. Headed by Warren Zapol, the Reginald Jenney Professor of Anaesthesia, and Kenneth Bloch, William Thomas Green Morton Professor of Anaesthesia, the lab has already documented the gas’ beneficial effect by selectively dilating the lung’s blood vessels and has developed life-saving treatments for hypoxic term infants, treatments that the Food and Drug Administration approved in 1999.Though the gas is already used widely to help improve lung function, Nagasaka said that its short lifespan made people think it didn’t last long enough to penetrate into other organs. More recent research, however, showed that its benefits can extend to preserving the heart, intestines, and liver from injury.Nagasaka’s work has begun to pay off. In 2008, she was the lead author on a paper that appeared as a featured article in the journal Anesthesiology showing that brief periods of nitric oxide inhalation by mice can protect against heart damage from the restriction of coronary artery blood flow and its subsequent resumption. The next step would be clinical trials.“I believe the excitement of this scientific development will be fully justified if it produces a dramatic impact on clinical medicine,” Nagasaka said.Yasuko Nagasaka sees a future where ambulances are equipped with tanks of a gas that, when inhaled during heart attacks, will dramatically cut the nearly 50 percent death rate.In that future, the tanks would contain nitric oxide, found widely today everywhere from automobile exhaust pipes to the human body. Not to be confused with nitrous oxide — the familiar laughing gas of dental-surgery lore — nitric oxide is chemically simpler, with just one nitrogen atom, and very reactive. It lasts under a second in the body before it combines with other atoms, including the potentially harmful oxygen compounds that arise during a heart attack.Nagasaka’s vision will take enormous amounts of hard work: She will need to conduct research as a principal investigator even as she takes on teaching duties and juggles responsibilities at home, where she is a single mother to two children, ages 11 and 7.“It has been challenging for me to work as a researcher on a full-time basis, in a foreign country where there is no family or friends to help,” said Nagasaka, who came to Harvard-affiliated Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) from Japan in 2005 and who is now an instructor in anesthesia at Harvard Medical School (HMS) and in MGH’s Department of Anesthesia and Critical Care. “My work requires a considerable amount of time being physically present in the laboratory.”The crushing squeeze of work and family is a familiar one in the medical research field. Young faculty members not only have to prove themselves in the laboratory during these years, but also have to juggle teaching, patient care, grant-writing, publication, and family duties. In 1995, Harvard Medical School began a special fellowship program aimed at easing these difficult years, especially for women, who often bear a greater share of responsibilities at home.The Eleanor and Miles Shore 50th Anniversary Fellowship Program for Scholars in Medicine awarded 81 fellowships of  $25,000 to $50,000 this year to lend a hand to Nagasaka and to others like her.The fellowships don’t convey the ability to be in two places at once, but they can be used to hire help — in the lab or at home — to ease the need to be so. They also can be used to opt out of clinical responsibilities to gain time for research or grant-writing, to help a new lab get its footing, or for other purposes.Nagasaka, who received her M.D. and Ph.D. degrees from the Tokyo Women’s Medical College, will use the fellowship for her science, where the grant will help her begin to gain independence as a researcher at MGH.If Nagasaka can fully unearth nitric oxide’s heart-helping effects, in coming years emergency workers might administer the gas to heart-attack sufferers, letting the compound traverse the lungs and travel to the heart. Once there, it would reduce the damage. However, the precise downstream effects of inhaled nitric oxide on the injured heart remain to be elucidated. Nagasaka will tackle this question with her laboratory team and the aid of a Shore fellowship.There’s real reason to think this future could become a reality. Nagasaka is researching nitric oxide’s effects in a pioneering MGH lab that has made other strides with this gas. Headed by Warren Zapol, the Reginald Jenney Professor of Anaesthesia, and Kenneth Bloch, William Thomas Green Morton Professor of Anaesthesia, the lab has already documented the gas’ beneficial effect by selectively dilating the lung’s blood vessels and has developed life-saving treatments for hypoxic term infants, treatments that the Food and Drug Administration approved in 1999.Though the gas is already used widely to help improve lung function, Nagasaka said that its short lifespan made people think it didn’t last long enough to penetrate into other organs. More recent research, however, showed that its benefits can extend to preserving the heart, intestines, and liver from injury.Nagasaka’s work has begun to pay off. In 2008, she was the lead author on a paper that appeared as a featured article in the journal Anesthesiology showing that brief periods of nitric oxide inhalation by mice can protect against heart damage from the restriction of coronary artery blood flow and its subsequent resumption. The next step would be clinical trials.“I believe the excitement of this scientific development will be fully justified if it produces a dramatic impact on clinical medicine,” Nagasaka said.The Nov. 18 presentation and reception will be held at the Tosteson Medical Education Center Atrium, 260 Longwood Ave., Boston, from 4 to 6 p.m. The awards presentation (4:30 p.m.) will be held in the Carl E. Walter Amphitheater. To download a pdf of the recipients.last_img read more

 

A joyful noise

first_imgThe Kuumba Singers of Harvard College celebrate the African-American aural tradition, and have done so for almost 40 years. The singers held their annual winter concerts, a holiday tradition of songs and dances, in Memorial Hall in early December.The group’s Web site says its name was chosen because it “allowed for all modes of diasporic expression. In Swahili, ‘kuumba’ roughly means creativity, though the literal meaning is more subtle: It is the creativity of leaving a space better than you found it.”Kuumba singer Amber James ’11 added, “The songs we sing and the dances we do and the poems we read, they are all designed to bring people together in celebration of black creativity and spirituality. The concert is so moving because of the range of emotions that are represented in music from the black diaspora. Pain, sorrow, strength, resilience, peace, joy, love, and countless others are all intensely felt through the music and movements.” Singing from the heart Impassioned vocalists Omobolaji Ogunsola ’10 (from left), Amber James ’11, Kaydene Grinnell ’10, and Marissa Glynias ’12 give it all they’ve got. A chorus line Matthews Mmopi ’11 (from left, red shirt), Nathan Whitfield ’09, Omobolaji Ogunsola ’10, Amber James ’11, Kaydene Grinnell ’10, and Marissa Glynias ’12 rehearse for the Kuumba Winter Concert. Dancer in red A singing and swaying Amber James ’11 at rehearsal for the Kuumba Winter Concert inside the Memorial Church. Harvard Kuumba Singers Dressed to sing Darkly and festively draped, the Kuumba Singers unite. Flight of the Kuumba Singers This regal-looking statue overhears Maxwell Nwaru ’10 rehearsing. Full house Under the Memorial Church’s white pillars, a rapt audience watches as the Kuumba Singers process to the stage. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff Photographerlast_img read more

 

Raymond D. Adams

first_imgRaymond Delacy Adams, considered by his peers the pre-eminent neurologist of the twentieth century and Bullard Professor of Neuropathology Emeritus at Harvard Medical School died on Oct. 18, 2008 at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. Dr. Adams was born in spare circumstances in a rural area near Portland, Oregon in 1911, the first child of William Henry Adams, an oil truck driver and Union Pacific baggage clerk, and Eva Mabel Morriss.Dr. Adams’s childhood was spent outdoors in sports, a harbinger of his vigorous adult pursuits of tennis and golf, but he began to work at physically demanding jobs from an early age. After graduating high school at 17 he crewed on an oil tanker from Alaska to Salvador. His first aspiration was to become a professional baseball pitcher but at the insistence of his parents he entered University of Oregon and chose to study psychology. While digging ditches to make money in Monmouth Oregon he eloped with Margaret Elinor Clark, a teacher in a one-room schoolhouse, who was orphaned and brought up by aunts.He attended the new Duke University School of Medicine in its third class by serendipity and remained a great supporter of the school. It required great effort to make ends meet while studying during the depression. He and a classmate were offered rooms in a janitor’s closet under the amphitheater in exchange for cutting large blocks of ice for the cafeteria and men’s bathrooms.Dr. Adams began his training in psychiatry as a Rockefeller fellow, first at the Massachusetts General Hospital and later at Yale. He could not reconcile the then grip of psychoanalysis with what he knew of brain diseases and he left for Boston City Hospital to study the physiological causes of mental and neurological diseases under Dr. Derek Denny-Brown. Relegated to the neuropathology laboratory, over ten years and thousands of gross and microscopic brain examinations, he developed the basis for modern clinicopathological correlation that was to establish HMS and MGH as the academic centers of American Neurology at the time.He came to prominence as a neuropathologist and neurologist during a ten year career at Boston City Hospital. He was recruited to the Massachusetts General Hospital in 1951, where he directed the neurology program for over 25 years. Adams was a spectacularly successful builder of institutions. When he took over the department at Massachusetts General Hospital, the entire neurology staff amounted to a handful. He built the first large program in pediatric neurology with specialized faculty, residency training, and new research laboratories. As a part of this effort he founded the Eunice K. Shriver Center for mental retardation research and patient care. His combined staff numbered in the hundreds by his retirement. The birth of the Neuroscience Study Program, with founders at MIT, the creation of the Department of Neurobiology, and the emergence of a general university doctoral program in Neuroscience at HMS were all supported by Dr. Adams.His HMS course in neuropathology was legendary in its breadth for a generation of medical students. He relished teaching, all from slides he had collected and distributed to each student, abandoning this role only when he felt the curriculum no longer accorded adequate time for his efforts.Raymond Adams and his close friend and colleague C Miller Fisher lead the clinical service and residency training program as a team. A sense of their presence, the force of their intellect, character and intensive concern for clinical analysis, patient care and the preparation of their residents were pervasive. For those who trained with Raymond Adams, it was an experience of unremitting effort and attention. His was an insistence upon “the details” essential to a coherent narrative of disease that was structured with a theory of disease process. There was no place for “dualistic copout” in his view that whatever we feel, think and do – the brain does it. He was dispassionately skeptical of his own formulations. He drew conscientiously upon contributions of our predecessors in clinical neuroscience with no barriers across the major Western European languages that were the reservoirs of our history. He placed great importance upon a test of ideas and observations through discussion with colleagues and his residents. His presentations whether in the informal rush and go of the patient’s bedside or in public, were never “a performance.”In an interview, he stated “when I arrived at the Massachusetts General Hospital as chief of the service, the field of neurology was extremely narrow.” It was important to “determine more precisely what the natural limits of neurology were.” “It was necessary to redefine the specialty of neurology.” He wanted to make it “inclusive of all diseases in which there was a lesion in the nervous system, or by inference from genetic and special clinical data, one could predict a lesion would be found by the development of refined methods.” Thus muscle disease, child neurology, mental retardation, developmental diseases and metabolic diseases created by medical problems, i.e., renal disease, hepatic disease, pulmonary disease, inflammatory and degenerative disease “were as much neurology as medicine.” He had the wisdom to, as chief of service, find “gifted people to develop subspecialty fields such as these far beyond my reach.”Many of his academic contributions were seminal. In cerebrovascular disease, he and Miller Fisher determined that the major cause of ischemic stroke was embolus rather than thrombosis and that the principal source was the heart. This laid the groundwork for attention to atrial fibrillation and the necessity of anticoagulant prophylaxis. Other contributions in the field of vascular disorders included a detailed elaboration of the syndrome of basilar occlusion and aortic dissection. His studies of a range of bacterial infectious processes and of syphilis directed attention to the leptomeninges as the primary site of disease that secondarily led to vascular damage and infarctions. He ascertained the features clinically and cytopathologically in a wide spectrum of hepatic disorders including encephalopathy following upon Eck fistula undertaken surgically for cirrhosis and varices that is now called hepatic encephalopathy. Studies of liver disease arose naturally out of a wider attention shared with Maurice Victor to the various syndromes with differential topographic expression associated with alcoholism and where they emphasized the importance of underlying nutritional deficiency and in particular deficiency of B vitamins. With Joseph M. Foley, he described asterixis.Other contributions include characterization of the clinical and pathological features of primary CNS lymphoma, designating them as reticulum sarcoma; a range of inflammatory, metabolic and degenerative disorders of muscle and peripheral nerve; the establishment of the clinical characteristics and concept of normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH); and his initiative in the neurology of the developing fetus and child. The creative and productive career of Raymond Adams must be viewed as the conceptual platform for the era of molecular neurobiology, imaging and computational cognitive neuroscience. He strongly supported an eclectic view of psychiatric disease, considering them to be problems of the brain, and stood behind numerous psychiatrists who had been ostracized from the community, at the time dominated by psychoanalysts.Dr. Adams published over 250 original papers and seven monographs. His lasting influence on American medicine began as one of the founding editors of Harrison’s Principles of Internal Medicine, for which continued to write almost all the neurology material through six editions. The other editors chided Ray gently that his neurological treatises in the book led them to consider renaming it to the “Principles of Internal Medicine and the Details of Neurology.” Ray took their advice and he and Maurice Victor wrote Principles of Neurology, the true classic of the field now in its 9th edition and considered by far the leading textbook in the field.Dr. Adams recognized the need for an international neurology community and regularly visited laboratories in Europe and elsewhere. He developed an abiding relationship with the American University of Beirut and extended himself to take residents from there and many sites abroad. Dr. Adams knitted together solid professional and personal relationships among residents and their mentors at MGH and abroad that endured over the half century that followed.All his trainees have remarked on Ray’s personal availability and his dedication to teaching. He was demanding, direct and honest, and always courteous. Team morale and collegiality were pervasive as result of his model behavior, looming personal presence, and work ethic. All were aware that they were part of an enterprise inspired by Ray Adams that constructed the core for the intellectual growth of neurology in the second part of the twentieth century. He is widely credited with establishing neurology’s and neurosciences’ place in modern medicine. He will be greatly missed.Respectfully submitted,Joseph B. Martin, chairpersonVerne CavinessJ. Philip KistlerAllan RopperPhilip WolfAnne Younglast_img read more

 

Here she is, Miss Massachusetts

You know the story: Harvard graduate, poised for success, becomes a doctor, lawyer, president, CEO.But here’s something you don’t see every day.Loren Galler Rabinowitz ’10, a former English concentrator just a month out of Harvard, has been crowned Miss Massachusetts.Galler Rabinowitz, a former professional figure skater, poet (under the mentorship of Pulitzer Prize-winning Jorie Graham), and future medical student, said she decided to enter the Miss Massachusetts competition at the urging of Michelle Hantman, Miss Massachusetts 2000.Hantman “suggested that the Miss America Organization would be a good fit for me, given my commitment to academics and public service,” recalled Galler Rabinowitz, who will head to Las Vegas in January to compete for the national title. “Additionally, the scholarship opportunities available through the program are extraordinary — particularly through the Allman Scholarship, which is specifically for students accepted at or attending medical school.”The Miss America Organization is the largest provider of academic scholarships to young women in the world. As Miss Massachusetts, Galler Rabinowitz received $8,000 in scholarships, and another $250 for winning the talent portion of the competition. (She is also a classically trained pianist.) The winner of the Miss America title receives a $50,000 academic scholarship.“As Miss Massachusetts, I have committed my year to charity work and public service,” said Galler Rabinowitz, who as a Harvard undergrad often woke at 5 a.m. to give youth skating lessons and tutor college-bound students. “In addition to doing appearances at events across the state, I’ll also be working to promote Miss America’s national platform, the Children’s Miracle Network, which raises funds for the medical treatment of nearly 17 million children annually.”Galler Rabinowitz, who was raised in Brookline, Mass., and in Barbados, will return to the island country where her mother runs a malnutrition center for children “to promote my personal platform, fighting childhood hunger, based on the research work I have done at my mother’s center.”As part of her time in Barbados, Galler Rabinowitz, who was awarded one of the English Department’s Le Baron Briggs Traveling Prizes for her humanitarian work and poetry, plans on furthering her writing and working at the Barbados Nutrition Center.“I’m also hoping to once again teach creative writing in a shelter for abused women and children, where I volunteered last summer.”“Thinking big,” Galler Rabinowitz said, was the most important thing she learned at Harvard.“This is an incredible, once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to use my voice to effect social change,” she said. “I’m looking forward to raising funds and awareness for children in need and talking to students across the state about what it means to be successful. To me, it’s getting to do something you’re passionate about every single day, and making the world around you a better place in the process.” read more