9 Hop across the border Fans of The Bridge will a

9 Hop across the border Fans of The Bridge will a

first_img9. Hop across the borderFans of The Bridge will already know that Sweden is within spitting distance of Copenhagen, linked by the Øresund Bridge which spans 7.5 miles across the Øresund Strait. Train services operate across to Malmö every 20 minutes via Copenhagen Airport, with connections further afield to Stockholm. Gothenburg, with all it’s medieval charms, is only an hour away and offers a relaxed change of pace, cobbled streets and laid-back bars. Danish krona are accepted in most places. RelatedTop 15 attractions and things to do in CopenhagenCopenhagen: the city break for Scandi chic, smørrebrød and the best beer in the world. Here's what to do in the royal capital of Denmark.Best things to do in Copenhagen on a budgetThink Copenhagen is an expensive city? Don't fret: you can still enjoy the high standard of living in this classy Scandinavian city while sticking to your holiday budget. Here are our top picks for cheap (or free!) things to do in Copenhagen.10 of the best European city breaks for Easter weekendIf you're wondering where to go for that long Easter weekend, how about four days in Paris, Copenhagen, or Berlin? Here are the best destinations to fly away for this Bank Holiday weekend, from Good Friday (April 14th) to Easter Monday (April 17th). 7. Discover Denmark’s story at the National MuseumTake a crash course in Danish history at the city’s National Museum, where you’ll find everything from Stone Age tools and Viking weaponry, to displays on the Inuits of Greenland and modern day life in Copenhagen. Kids will love the huge collection of doll’s houses, while there is also a separate Children’s Museum where they can dress up in clothes from 100 years ago and clamber aboard a Viking ship. Entrance is free and the museum is closed on Mondays. 5. Fill up at TorvehallerneTucked away next to Nørreport station, Torvehallerne is a foodie Aladdin’s cave. Ranging across a brace of glass buildings, the sixty-odd independent stalls ply their trade selling local delicacies, fresh meat and fish, cheeses and more, with lots of eclectic places to grab lunch or just a coffee and pastry. Copenhageners are mad for porridge, and you’ll start to understand why if you visit Grød, just one of Torvehallerne’s food stalls. Grød means porridge in Danish and this stall sells its namesake piled high with colourful, off-the-wall accompaniments. 10. Enter a communeWant to see something truly different? Christiania is one of the more unlikely of Copenhagen’s attractions: a peaceful, self-reliant community complete with its own national art gallery and ‘Now entering the EU’ exit signs. Pungent wafts of cannabis from the sellers on Pushers’ Street hint at how the "free city" of Copenhagen has responded to this self-proclaimed autonomous neighbourhood of around 850 residents, which has existed here since 1971 with little state interference. 1. Get a brew onIt may be home to Carlsberg, one of the world’s largest brewing companies, but Copenhagen is also home to something far more interesting: a new wave of home-grown craft brewers that have set up shop here over the past few years. Mikkel Borg Bjergsø and Kristian Keller were trailblazers when they started a Denmark-wide phenomenon eight years ago with the opening of the Mikkeller microbrewery. Nowadays, they enjoy worldwide recognition with three Copenhagen bars and several outposts from Barcelona to Bangkok. An apero at the original Vesterbro bar is highly recommended, where you can make your way through 15 different Mikkeller microbrews on draught, including pilsners, IPAs and more. Get swatting up on you hops before you board a flight to Copenhagen in one of the UK’s best craft beer pubs from this list. 3. Dig Danish designOk, so many of us could admit to an unhealthy obsession for Swedish flat-pack furniture, but it is the Danes who have a real finesse for interior design. This highly regarded local industry is taken seriously by everyone in Denmark and showcased in every hotel and restaurant in Copenhagen. Head to the Dansk Design Center for the latest on-trend exhibitions, or plan every aspect of your dream home, from kitchen gadgetry to bathroom fabrics, with a spot of window shopping at the four-floored colossus of Illums Bolighus. center_img 8. Dine at a legendNoma is frequently awarded the moniker ‘Best Restaurant in the World’ and it’s worth booking (well) ahead for dinner here. The menu is set and focuses on fresh produce, cooked simply, with multiple courses ranging from sea urchin and hazelnuts to berries and greens soaked in vinegar for a whole year. Settle in for hours of tickled tastebuds and be sure to add the wine pairing for the ultimate experience. Closed January-April 2016, reopening May, with bookings taken from January. Menu 1700 krona per person, wine pairing 1100 krone per person. If you’re interested in the finest dining money can buy, check out our guide to the other top 9 eateries claiming to be among the best in the world… 4. Step into your own Nordic noirTV’s The Bridge is famously set in both Copenhagen and the Swedish town of Malmö, but it was the jumper-clad Sarah Lund and the power-suited Statsminister Birgitte Nyborg who really kickstarted our obsession with the immensely popular Nordic noir genre. Peter and Ping take fans on the trail of the fictional detective and prime minister on their themed The Killing and Borgen tours to numerous city locations you’re sure to recognise from the small screen. 6. Stroll through Tivoli GardensThis nineteenth century amusement park is a dreamy whirl of carousels and carnivals where there is always something to see. Visit on a Friday in the summer to catch a free rock concert on the open air Plaenen stage (from 10pm) or swing by in winter to check out the fairytale Christmas lights and fabulous New Year fireworks. Don’t miss a ride on rollercoaster The Demon (smile for the camera), a turn on the landmark Copenhagen Wheel or the chance to drop 63 metres at speed on the Golden Tower. Entrance to the gardens is 99 krona; a wristband for unlimited rides costs an extra 209 krona (220 Friday to Sunday). Find out which other holiday hotspots we’ve tipped to be big in 2016 – and enter our competition for the chance to win £100 of travel vouchers!Inspired to visit Scandinavia? Check out our holiday guides below for more effortlessly cool destinations…Top nine things to do in HelsinkiCheck out the best things to see and do in the Finnish capital, from where to eat to where to stay.Six reasons to visit southern ScandinaviaFind out why you should put Denmark (and its beaches) on your wish list for places to visit in 2016.The six best places to see the Northern LightsWant to see the Northern Lights? This winter is set to be a magical one in the far north, with the aurora borealis said to be at its most dazzling in years. Skyscanner is the world’s travel search engine, helping your money go further on flights, hotels and car hire.ReturnOne wayMulti-cityFromAdd nearby airports ToAdd nearby airportsDepart14/08/2019Return21/08/2019Cabin Class & Travellers1 adult, EconomyDirect flights onlySearch flights Map 2. Tuck into smørrebrødA staple of the Danish diet, smørrebrød is as much a quintessential part of Copenhagen life as the bicycle. Two or three of these open sandwiches, typically made with slices of buttered rye bread brimming with a plethora of fillings and toppings, is enough to curb your appetite. It’s served almost everywhere and no two locals can seem to agree on where to find the best plates, but we say try Schønnemanns, where you’ll find a large menu with choices ranging from the classics to the creative.last_img

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